Elevator Etiquette: The proper and polite way to ride an elevator.

Following the steps below will help us eliminate “Hell”evators.

When you step onto an elevator you are to assume one or two roles. The first being the driver, the first person who steps onto the elevator. The second role is the passenger.

By stepping onto the elevator first, you are taking on the responsibility of all the riders. As the other passengers enter, it’s polite to hold the “Open Door” button or simply put your hand over the door to prevent it from beginning to close on a passenger. Once everyone has safely boarded, ask your passengers what floor they’re going to. Press the proper buttons and your job is done! Exit quickly when you arrive at your destination.

What if you step on the elevator first, but do not want to take on the responsibility? Well first off, stop stepping on the elevator first. But I understand accidents happen, so if you accidentally step on the elevator the least rude thing to do is to press your button and quickly move to the back of the elevator. Abandon the controls and let someone else take over.

Now passengers, just because you’re not the driver doesn’t mean you can be careless and willy-nilly (whatever that means) on the elevator. It’s important to show your driver respect. If your driver asks what floor you’re going to, do NOT reach across their body to hit the button yourself. This is insult. Trust that your drive knows what the number 5 looks like and can press it for you. If your driver does not ask what floor you’re going too and continues to stand in front of the controls, it’s ok to say “Would you please hit 6? Thanks.” (Remember the please and thank you!)

Would-be passengers, this paragraph is for you. If you come across an elevator where the doors have already begun to close DO NOT stick your arm inside to cause the door to re-open. Everyone inside the elevator will hate you and spend the whole ride thinking of ways they could torture you. Just wait for the next elevator.

Lastly, never ever fart in an elevator.

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10 Comments

Filed under Shannon

10 responses to “Elevator Etiquette: The proper and polite way to ride an elevator.

  1. Amanda

    Great advice Shan. Couldn’t have said it any better. And I want to elaborate a little more on the part where you tell the passangers NOT to reach over and press a button after the drivers offers. This is especially true if the passenger is White and the driver is a minority. Not only is it just plain rude, but we will think that you are so racist, that you won’t give us the respect of allowing us to do our job.

  2. carl

    Never looked at it like that..I never mind being the driver..Sometimes you feel it was your good deed for the day…Plus when your in control people seem more polite..they thank you for holding the door or pressing there floor..but if you dont do any of that and I’m driving I will just ignore you even asking what floor and make you reach to press it yourself.

  3. Roxy

    I think the world would be a much happier place if everyone read this blog. Just today I asked someone “2 Please” because he was the driver, boarded first (before the women) and stood directly in front of the number pad. He took the driver position but then had the audacity to look at me as if it was an inconvenience for him to push the button for me. Thanks ladies!

  4. Roxy

    One thing I’m still unsure of, what’s the proper thing to do if you walk on an elevator, people are already on but no one is quite in the driver’s seat and you don’t know who the first person on was? This is one place I get confused. I dont want to ask the wrong person to push the button for my floor. Any suggestions?

  5. @Carl…If pushing an elevator button is your good deed of the day, then those who will REALLY be in need of help are screwed. lol. Just joshin’

  6. Pingback: Train Ettiquette | Two Non-Cents

  7. Pingback: Train Etiquette | Two Non-Cents

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